HEALTH WELLNESS

Why Flouride In Your Drinking Water Is Bad For You

Fluoride is promoted as good for your teeth. But is it? And is it good for the rest of you?.

The city in which i live has recently decided that it is, once again, putting fluoride in our water system in the name of “improving dental health in our children.” But is fluoride helpful or harmful? Consider the following list of studies and research papers to see what the experts have to say about fluoride.

Fluoride is a substance that is naturally occurring in our environment. But the concern is the amount of it we are subjected to. The concern is that adding a substance with this much of a hazardous effect

Consider these excerpts from the following journals, papers, studies and government websites and decide for yourself whether or not you should be filtering your water or drinking bottled water.

For instance, this from the NIH…. “Blood levels during lifelong consumption can harm heart, bone, brain, and even developing teeth enamel.”

Yes. Flouride is bad for you. Is there anything that is GOOD for your teeth? Take a look at this surprising approach to natural dental care. It works!

So, let’s look at the different types of findings, by category.

Excess fluoride lowers IQ

Of all the studies I’ve found, those documenting reduced IQ are the most prevalent. I will show quotes from several of them here, with listings of others for follow-up for reference for those who wish to dig in further.

An study NIH correlates high fluoride levels with lower IQ

This was a study from the National Institutes of Health to assess the IQ of school going children aged 10-12 years in villages of Mysore district, India with different fluoride levels.

From the study: “… significant relationships were found between water fluoride levels and Intelligence Quotient of school children (P < 0.05). In the high fluoride village, the proportion of children with IQ below 90, i.e. below average IQ was larger compared to normal and low fluoride village. Age, gender, parent education level and family income had no significant association with IQ.”

Conclusion: School children residing in area with higher than normal water fluoride level demonstrated more impaired development of intelligence when compared to school children residing in areas with normal and low water fluoride levels. Thus, children’s intelligence can be affected by high water fluoride levels.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26381633

A study from India correlates lower IQ in children with excessive exposure to fluoride.

The study is entitled, “A correlation between Serum Vitamin, Acetylcholinesterase Activity and IQ in Children with Excessive Endemic Fluoride exposure in Rajasthan, India.” This study documents the damage done by excessive exposure to fluoride as well as a consideration of how proper vitamin supplementation can mitigate some of the damage otherwise incurred from the fluoride.

The results of the present study may conclude that fluoride
exposure promote oxidative stress and alteration in trace metal
analysis. These alterations may induce pathophysiological
activities due to lack of proper drinking water source. High
fluoride content in the drinking water (bore well water) and
associated fluoride induced health problem among the children.

Microsoft Word – 2.ISCA-IRJMedS-2013-010

From a study of the IQ Levels of Four to Seven-year-old Children in High Fluoride Areas

The results show that a high fluoride intake has a clear influence on the IQ of preschool children, manifesting itself primarily as damage to performance intelligence. The study also indicates that the proportion of preschool children living in high fluoride areas that have retarded head development (based on measuring of the circumference) is significantly higher than the low fluoride control group, and that children with this developmental deficient demonstrate a lower IQ than children with normal head development.

A Study of the IQ Levels of Four to Seven-year-old Children in High Fluoride Areas | Request PDF (researchgate.net)

So many other studies show decreased IQ and cognitive function

It is an extensive list, though not an exhaustive one. But for more references, see the following:

Damage to the nervous system

Joint pain, numbness, scoliosis, sleep disorders

A comparative analysis of the results of multiple tests in patients with chronic industrial fluorosis

Nervous system symptoms and signs: Symptoms were present
in all 72 cases in Group A, with dizziness, weakness, degradation of
memory, sleep disorders, and joint pain
present in 72 cases (100%),
headaches in 60 cases (83.3%), waist pain in 70 cases (97.3%), blurred
vision and heavy perspiration
in 57 cases (79.2%), numbness of the
extremities
in 54 cases (75%), paroxysmal syncope in 20 cases (27.8%),
increased muscular tension in 41 cases (56.9%), reduced pain sensation
throughout the body in 40 cases (55.6%), reduced muscular strength in
the extremities
in 24 cases (33.3%) ocular-facial reflexes and orbicularis
oculi reflex positive in 21 cases (29.1%), Babinski sign positive in eight
cases (11.1%), and joint deformities or scoliosis in 60 cases (83.3%). In
Group B, symptoms were present in 23 cases (53.5%), with dizziness
present in 12 cases (27.4%), weakness and degradation of memory in 10
cases (23.3%), sleep disorders in nine cases (21.2%), and joint pain in 20
cases (46.5%). All 42 cases in Group C were without signs and
symptoms.

duan-1995 (fluoridealert.org)

Also, consider the following.

ADHD

Exposure to fluoridated water and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder prevalence among children and adolescents in the United States: an ecological association

Parents reported higher rates of medically-diagnosed ADHD in their children in states in which a greater proportion of people receive fluoridated water from public water supplies. The relationship between fluoride exposure and ADHD warrants future study.

http://ehjournal.biomedcentral.com/…/s12940-015-0003-1

Learning Impairment and Memory Impairment

Fluoride and Arsenic Exposure Impairs Learning and Memory and Decreases mGluR5 Expression in the Hippocampus and Cortex in Rats

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3997496/

Reproductive issues

Adverse Effects of High Concentrations of Fluoride on Characteristics of the Mouse Ovary

Taken together, this study suggests that the administration of high concentrations of fluoride to female mice not only results in ovarian damage but also significantly reduces the number and the fertilization potential of mature oocytes by reducing the expression of genes that play an important role in the normal development and maturation of oocytes. The results obtained in this study could thus be employed for statistical analysis of the association between exposure to high concentrations of fluoride and reproductive disorders in women.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4460091/

Hypothyroidism

Are fluoride levels in drinking water associated with hypothyroidism prevalence in England? A large observational study of GP practice data and fluoride levels in drinking water

http://jech.bmj.com/…/early/2015/02/09/jech-2014-204971…

Dental Fluorosis (damage to the teeth from excessive exposure to fluoride)

Chronic Fluoride Toxicity: Dental Fluorosis

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3433161/

Diabetes

Community water fluoridation predicts increase in age-adjusted incidence and prevalence of diabetes in 22 states from 2005 and 2010

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5116242/

Kidney disease

Fluoride in drinking water and diet: the causative factor of chronic kidney diseases in the North Central Province of Sri Lanka

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4491063/

Low bone density

High fluoride and low calcium levels in drinking water is associated with low bone mass, reduced bone quality and fragility fractures in sheep

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4048471/

Oxidative Stress

Fluoride induces oxidative damage and SIRT1/autophagy through ROS-mediated JNK signaling

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4684823/

Reducing Exposure to High Fluoride Drinking Water in Estonia—A Countrywide Study

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3987025/

Risk Assessment of Fluoride Intake from Tea in the Republic of Ireland and its Implications for Public Health and Water Fluoridation

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4808922/

The relationships between low levels of urine fluoride on children’s intelligence, dental fluorosis in endemic fluorosis areas in Hulunbuir, Inner Mongolia, China.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21237562

Conclusion

Perhaps it is said best in an article in the National Library of Medicine.

The authors conclude that available evidence suggests that fluoride has a potential to cause major adverse human health problems, while having only a modest dental caries prevention effect. As part of efforts to reduce hazardous fluoride ingestion, the practice of artificial water fluoridation should be reconsidered globally…

Water Fluoridation: A Critical Review of the Physiological Effects of Ingested Fluoride as a Public Health Intervention – PMC (nih.gov)

Fluoride does show up naturally. Sufficient vitamin intake seems to be able to mitigate some of the damage from ingesting it. But we certainly don’t need to add even more of it to our water when even the warnings on the toothpaste tubes caution against swallowing the stuff.

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Himalayan pink salt and type 2 diabetes management
HEALTH WELLNESS

Coptic Salt For Type 2 Diabetes – Benefits, Effects

A brief overview of Type 2 Diabetes

Type 2 diabetes is a chronic condition that affects the way your body metabolizes sugar (glucose), an important source of fuel for your body. With type 2 diabetes, your body either resists the effects of insulin — a hormone that regulates the movement of sugar into your cells — or doesn't produce enough insulin to maintain normal glucose levels.

Type 2 diabetes can develop for several reasons.

Genetics and lifestyle factors are the most significant ones. Being overweight or obese increases your risk significantly. Lack of physical activity, poor diet, and even age can contribute to the development of type 2 diabetes.

When you have type 2 diabetes, sugar builds up in your bloodstream instead of being used as energy.

This happens because your body's cells aren't using insulin properly, a condition called insulin resistance. At first, your body makes more insulin to get glucose into your cells.

But over time, your body can't keep up and can't make enough insulin to keep your blood glucose levels normal.

Concerned about type-2 diabetes? There are better places to focus your attention for dealing with glucose intolerance. You should examine the benefits of INTERMITTENT FASTING.

This buildup of sugar in your blood can lead to various health problems. Long-term complications of type 2 diabetes include heart and blood vessel disease, nerve damage (neuropathy), kidney damage (nephropathy), eye damage, and foot damage from poor blood flow or nerve damage, among others.

So where does Himalayan salt (coptic salt) factor into all of this?

 Some background on Himalayan salt and its origins

Himalayan salt (or Coptic Salt), often recognized by its pink hue, is a type of rock salt that hails from the Punjab region of Pakistan, near the foothills of the Himalayas. This region is home to one of the richest salt fields in the entire world, dating back to the Precambrian Age when the Earth was still relatively young.

The history of Himalayan salt is as rich as its color. It is believed that the salt deposits were discovered around 326 BC when the troops led by Alexander the Great stopped in the region. However, the first records of mining are from the Janjua people in the 1200s.

ALSO: explore the benefits of alternative therapies like Chlorine Dioxide Therapy

Himalayan salt was traditionally mined by hand, which preserved its natural structure and allowed it to retain its unique mineral composition. It contains over 84 trace minerals and elements, including potassium, magnesium, and calcium, which give it its signature pink color.

In the modern world, Himalayan salt has gained popularity for its perceived health benefits and aesthetic appeal. It's used in cooking, spa treatments, and even in decorative lamps. Some believe it can improve air quality, enhance mood, and provide a number of health benefits.

But these claims are not universally supported by scientific evidence.

Despite the debates surrounding its health benefits, there's no denying that Himalayan salt has made a significant impact on the culinary and wellness industries. Its unique history and striking color make it a fascinating subject, from its ancient origins in the Himalayan foothills to its modern uses around the globe.

Trace Elements And Nutrients In Pink Salt (Himalayan Salt)

Himalayan salt (pink salt) is believed to contain up to 84 trace minerals and elements. Here are some of the most notable ones:

1. Sodium: Essential for maintaining proper fluid balance and nerve transmission.
2. Potassium: Important for heart and muscle function.
3. Calcium: Crucial for bone health and nerve function.
4. Magnesium: Helps with over 300 biochemical reactions in the body.
5. Iron: Necessary for blood production and the transportation of oxygen.
6. Phosphorus: Plays a role in the formation of bones and teeth.
7. Zinc: Supports immune function and wound healing.
8. Selenium: Acts as an antioxidant, protecting cells from damage.
9. Copper: Helps with energy production and iron absorption.
10. Manganese: Supports bone health and helps in carbohydrate metabolism.
11. Chromium: Works with insulin to regulate blood sugar levels.

Will it help with type-2 diabetes?

Maybe..... but color me skeptical. Consider these references.

Anti-Diabetic Effect of Balanced Deep-Sea Water and Its Mode of Action in High-Fat Diet Induced Diabetic Mice - PMC (nih.gov) ("we suggest that balanced deep sea-water, a novel activator for glucose uptake, is a valuable agent for treating or preventing diabetes.")

Looks like sea-water might help.

Is Himalayan Salt Good for You? Pros and Cons, Nutrition Information, and More (webmd.com) (WebMD says not, because the concentrations of the trace minerals is too low to be useful.)

An Analysis of the Mineral Composition of Pink Salt Available in Australia - PMC (nih.gov) (This NIH study agrees with the Web MD study - "This study provides evidence that there are both nutritive and non-nutritive minerals in pink salt available for purchase in Australia, but that wide variations exist and there is the potential for contaminant ingestion. While one teaspoon (5 g) of pink salt contained small quantities of all nutrients, the levels did not meaningfully contribute to nutrient intake, with the exception of sodium which reached the Australian suggested dietary target. Any potential health benefits provided by the higher nutrient content in pink salt would be counteracted by the large amount of sodium that would also be consumed. Importantly, one pink salt sample from Peru contained a level of lead which exceeded the FSANZ maximum contaminant level. The risk to public health from potentially harmful non-nutritive minerals needs to be addressed by further research and further investigated by food regulatory bodies. Pink salt should only be consumed according to Australian guidelines at <6 g of salt per day from all food and beverage sources."

Verdict: seems like the hype over pink salt (Himalayan salt) is a little overblown. 

Please note that while these minerals are present in Himalayan salt, they are in trace amounts. This means that while they contribute to your overall intake of these nutrients, they should not be your primary source.

A balanced diet rich in fruits, vegetables, lean proteins, and whole grains is the best way to ensure you're getting the nutrients you need. As always, it's important to use salt sparingly due to its high sodium content, which can contribute to high blood pressure and other health issues if consumed in excess.

Looks like, if you're going to use salt anyway, this is better than the normal stuff. But it isn't a cure-all for your type-2 diabetes.

As always, get advice from your doctor. These articles are for informational purposes only. I am not a doctor. I just collect research and pass it on to my readers. But don't take my word for it. Ask your doctor.

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