Federal Judge Temporarily Blocks Navy Vaccine Mandate

Scott Gottlieb, the former Food and Drug Administration (FDA) Commissioner is coming to the defense of parents. On Sunday, Gottlieb said parents and the physicians of their  children should be the ones to decide whether or not children receive COVID-19 booster shots, and not mandated by schools.

“I certainly don’t think schools should be mandating boosters. I think this should be left up to the discretion of parents and their physicians. You know, it’s going to depend on the individual circumstance,” Gottlieb said Sunday in an interview with CBS’s Margaret Brennan on “Face the Nation.”

Not only did Gottlieb explain that children, especially those between the ages of 12 and 16 years old, showed a more robust vaccine durability than adults but added they are also much less at risk from infection.

The Hill reports:

Instead of the previous recommendation of receiving a booster shot six months after a second dose, the FDA is expected to also amend that recommendation to five months for both children and adults.

The authorization, which requires signoff from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, is expected to be endorsed by its director, Rochelle Walensky, according to the Times.

The decision over whether to require boosters may prove tricky given that states may decide to amend their own definitions of what it means to be “fully vaccinated.” 

Last month, New York Gov. Kathy Hochul (D) said she was planning to introduce legislation that would tweak the definition of “fully vaccinated” to include the booster shot. 

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